Glass Canada – CAUTION: MOVING GLASS

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Caution: Moving Glass

Glass Canada journalist, Colleen Cross, reports on the potential dangers in the glass industry and how awareness of hazards can make automation safer.

“Moving glass has greater potential than stationary to injure or kill those handling it. Whether flat glass is being moved by forklift, suctioned lift, L-cart or automated system, it presents laceration, amputation and crushing hazards that may not be immediately apparent. Glass workers need to be educated on these hazards and taught procedures and habits that reduce the risk of injury on the job.”
Glass Canada features an image of an AGNORA employee safely operating the lamination line.
“Dangers from automated equipment include pinch points, impacts from moving parts and electrocution. Simply making workers aware of what dangers a particular piece of equipment poses goes a long way toward making the workplace safer, safety experts say. ”

Glass Canada finishes the article off with some valuable Canadian plant safety resources. We thought it might be helpful to list them here too.

CSA group
www.csagroup.org/ca/en/services/codes-and-standards

Association of Workers’ Compensation Boards of Canada
www.awcbc.org/en/safetyassociations.asp

Legislation that applies across Canada (not specific to glass industry)
www.awcbc.org/en/occupationalhealthandsafetyactsandregulations.asp

Workplace Safety Prevention Services
www.healthandsafetyontario.ca/wsps/home.aspx
1-877-494-WSPS, ext. 977, or 905-614-1400

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
www.ccohs.ca
1-800-668-4284 or 905-572-2981

About Glass Canada

Glass Canada is a leading source of information for the Canadian glass and Metal Industry. Our editorial content focuses on leading edge equipment, technology, and glass professionals in the industry. Our goal is to provide businesses with an effective advertising medium to reach people directly involved in all aspects of the Canadian Glass Industry, while highlighting innovative technology and design employed daily by glaziers in the installation of glass and metal products.

Glass Canada provides a medium for readers and associations to share concerns and present industry developments in the use of high performance glass and innovative curtain wall systems. It is a tribute to glazing contractors, architects and suppliers who work together to put Canadian cities “under the glass.”

Glass Canada is endorsed by the Canadian Glass Association (CGA) and carries its newsletter each issue.

 

Read More: http://www.glasscanadamag.com/content/view/2779/134/